KILLING GODS IN THE DESERT

In Roman culture, the first “atheists” were these peculiar Christian types. They rejected the influence of the gods in their lives, a kind of fulfilled Socratic vision with the Nazarene, Jesus, at the center. This was the pre-Christian world; a world filled with pagan idolatry and sexual governance because most of these Roman gods contained some…

Idolatrous Goat Weirdness

Let me explain. Tonight I was talking to my students about a fairly cringe-worthy subject related to idol worship; the whole context of the classic who-do-you-say-that-I-am business in Matthew 16; and beastly, sexual awkwardness in the public square of the Phillippi Jesus took his youth group (disciples) to. Jesus was asking the question in the…

Exorcist-In-Chief (Part II): Christian Optimism Is Boring – Guest Post

Christian Optimism is Boring. After Trump won the Presidential Election (God, help us all), I was surprised by my Facebook feed. It was so…boring. Granted, every single post was election-related, which was expected, but nevertheless, I. Was. So. Bored. Why? This: “Guys, let’s just all remember that no matter what happens tonight, we’re all people…

A Theology of Alternative Endings (Part 1)

As a student of Philosophy, and an observer of the various ways others think and act, I mostly pay attention to two things: Coffee and Kierkegaard. The former is for obvious reasons, sometimes for taste but mostly for necessity. The latter because, well, he is the thinker I mostly attach my current faith-awakening to. It…

Book Review #1: The Very Good Meh

In this post I review Lisa Sharon Harper’s book, The Very Good Gospel. She is the chief church engagement officer at Sojourners, a nonprofit organization committed to putting Christian faith into action in the pursuit of social justice, peace, and environmental stewardship. She is the author of several books, including Evangelical Does Not Equal Republican…or Democrat and…

Remembering Harper Lee

How many of us first encountered the idea of Atticus and didn’t feel the desire to be him, in some way, or some form? How many of us felt the sting of injustice, but the youthful innocence necessary at the end of an experience? How many of us first learned of the indignity of poverty…

The S.I.N. Problem

“The movement called Christianity cannot be understood apart from the Jewish concept of shalom. The Christian gospel does not call people to give their mental assent to a certain list of correct propositions, nor does it provide its adherents with a password that will gain them disembodied bliss when they die and the pleasure of…